(Source: lanadelgifs)

(Source: onlybombs, via tenfeetsofbeauty)

shi-no-monogatari:



- Knights of Sidonia || ★

shi-no-monogatari:

- Knights of Sidonia || 

(via explosiveweapons)

(Source: elsetetra, via explosiveweapons)

sciencefictiongallery:

2001, l’Odyssée de l’espace (2001 A Space Odyssey), 1968.

sciencefictiongallery:

2001, l’Odyssée de l’espace (2001 A Space Odyssey), 1968.

(via explosiveweapons)

explosiveweapons:

shimmyshimmykokobop:

Dali and Alice Cooper 


This is perfect.

explosiveweapons:

shimmyshimmykokobop:

Dali and Alice Cooper 

This is perfect.

historicaltimes:

Sub on Sub Action! Devilfish , being sunk as a target by Wahoo at San Francisco, CA., 14 August 1968.

historicaltimes:

Sub on Sub Action! Devilfish , being sunk as a target by Wahoo at San Francisco, CA., 14 August 1968.

(via explosiveweapons)

explosiveweapons:

By far one of my favorite parts of Berserk.

(Source: shishishio)

explosiveweapons:

A lazy, rainy Sunday calls for messy hair, books and a Nails hoodie.

explosiveweapons:

A lazy, rainy Sunday calls for messy hair, books and a Nails hoodie.

bag-of-dirt:

A 23-year-old Czech inmate at Flossenbürg concentration camp, recently liberated by the elements U.S. Army’s 2d Stryker Cavalry Regiment, 90th Infantry Division and 97th Infantry Division, is held aloft by fellow internees, suffering from severe dysentery and malnourishment. Flossenbürg concentration camp was built in May 1938 by the Schutzstaffel (SS) Economic-Administrative Main Office. During the war, most of the inmates sent to Flossenbürg, or to one of about 100 sub-camps, came from the German-occupied eastern territories and prior to 1944, most were political prisoners or members various resistance groups from German-occupied nations. There were smaller but significant numbers of individuals imprisoned for criminal offenses, POWs, homosexuals and clergy. The inmates in Flossenbürg were housed in 16 huge wooden barracks, its crematorium was built in a valley straight outside the camp. By 1945, there were almost 40,000 inmates held in the whole Flossenbürg camp system, including almost 11,000 women. Inmates were made to work in the Flossenbürg camp quarry and in armaments making. Underfeeding, sickness, and overwork was rife among the inmates, and with the harshness of the guards, this treatment killed thousands of inmates. As American forces approached the camp in early 1945, the Germans began the forced evacuation of 22,000 inmates from the main camp, including 1,700 Jews, to Dachau concentration camp, leaving behind only those too sick to walk. On the death march, SS guards shot any inmate too sick to keep up. Before they reached Dachau, more than 7,000 inmates had been shot or had collapsed and died. By the time the U.S. Army liberated the camp on 23 April 1945, more than 30,000 inmates had died at Flossenbürg and U.S. troops found only about 1,600 ill and weak prisoners remaining, mostly in the camp’s hospital barracks. Flossenbürg concentration camp, Flossenbürg, Bavaria, Germany. April 1945.

bag-of-dirt:

A 23-year-old Czech inmate at Flossenbürg concentration camp, recently liberated by the elements U.S. Army’s 2d Stryker Cavalry Regiment, 90th Infantry Division and 97th Infantry Division, is held aloft by fellow internees, suffering from severe dysentery and malnourishment. Flossenbürg concentration camp was built in May 1938 by the Schutzstaffel (SS) Economic-Administrative Main Office. During the war, most of the inmates sent to Flossenbürg, or to one of about 100 sub-camps, came from the German-occupied eastern territories and prior to 1944, most were political prisoners or members various resistance groups from German-occupied nations. There were smaller but significant numbers of individuals imprisoned for criminal offenses, POWs, homosexuals and clergy. The inmates in Flossenbürg were housed in 16 huge wooden barracks, its crematorium was built in a valley straight outside the camp. By 1945, there were almost 40,000 inmates held in the whole Flossenbürg camp system, including almost 11,000 women. Inmates were made to work in the Flossenbürg camp quarry and in armaments making. Underfeeding, sickness, and overwork was rife among the inmates, and with the harshness of the guards, this treatment killed thousands of inmates. As American forces approached the camp in early 1945, the Germans began the forced evacuation of 22,000 inmates from the main camp, including 1,700 Jews, to Dachau concentration camp, leaving behind only those too sick to walk. On the death march, SS guards shot any inmate too sick to keep up. Before they reached Dachau, more than 7,000 inmates had been shot or had collapsed and died. By the time the U.S. Army liberated the camp on 23 April 1945, more than 30,000 inmates had died at Flossenbürg and U.S. troops found only about 1,600 ill and weak prisoners remaining, mostly in the camp’s hospital barracks. Flossenbürg concentration camp, Flossenbürg, Bavaria, Germany. April 1945.

(via explosiveweapons)